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HubbleSOURCE

Informal Science Education Resources
from the home of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope

Video & Immersive Visualizations

Immersive Dome Visualization: Galaxy Collision

  • Format 1
  • 1024 x 1024 fisheye dome projection
  • 1698 Frames, numbered 0000 to 1697
  • Frames 0000 to 0100 are static title frames
  • PNG format image files

 

  • Format 2
  • 2048 x 2048 pixel fisheye dome projection (downsample of 3200 x 3200 render)
  • 1698 Frames, numbered 0000 to 1697
  • Frames 0000 to 0100 are static title frames
  • PNG format image files

 

  • Format 3
  • 3200 x 3200 pixel fisheye dome projection
  • 1698 Frames, numbered 0000 to 1697
  • Frames 0000 to 0100 are static title frames
  • PNG format image file

 

  • Format 4
  • 3800 x 3800 pixel fisheye dome projection
  • 1597 Frames, numbered 0001 to 1597
  • TIFF format image files w/ LZW compression

 

  • To request a visualization or for more information, contact us.

Details

  • Title: Galaxy Collision
  • Description:
    A visualization of the collision of two spiral galaxies.
  • In this visualization of a computer simulation, two spiral galaxies are set on a collision course. As one slices through the other, both are disrupted. The tidal forces of gravity produce long tails of material streaming away from the collision. The central regions relatively quickly fall together and merge.
  • The visualization is based on a supercomputer simulation, which calculated the motions of 262,144 particles under the forces of gravity and hydrodynamics. The gas particles are shown in blue and the stars in yellow. Each particle is visualized with a size corresponding to its effective size in the calculation. A background field of galaxies was added to provide camera motion clues and astronomical context. The simulation covers about 500 million years of the collison.
  • Credits: Visualization by Frank Summers, Space Telescope Science Institute, Simulation by Chris Mihos, Case Western Reserve University, and Lars Hernquist, Harvard University
  • Camera Choreography:
    The camera motion is somewhat complex, and can be discerned by watching the movement of the background galaxy field. The camera starts by dropping down to reveal the first galaxy in the front right and then the second galaxy to the front left. The camera also moves in toward the galaxies to get a closer view of the initial collision. After the initial collision, the camera continues to drop slowly, now increasing the distance to the galaxies and tilting a bit to keep the tidal tails on screen as much as possible. The camera also rotates slowly to increase the sweeping feel of the tidal tails passing above.
  • The camera choreography was designed for uni-directional seating, where there is a common focus point of the audience (front and center, about 60 degrees up).

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